Johns Hopkins Climate Change Symposium: The Relevance of Deep Time Climate

Johns Hopkins Climate Change Symposium: The Relevance of Deep Time Climate

District of Columbia

Dr. Kirk Johnson of the National Academies of Sciences (NAS) provided an overview of The Relevance of Deep Time Climate, including the geologic history of climate change and its progression during human history, with a forecast of future change. Among the key issues he noted, our generation of modern humans is the first to live in a world of 300 parts per million (PPM) greenhouse gas (GHGs) levels. Current levels are 415 PPM and forecasted to become consistent with the “hot house” earth of geologic times unless strong mitigation action is taken. He also provided a sneak preview of the new Fossil Hall of the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC on June 8, 2019 and its coverage of Earth’s climate history, including a life size mount of Megalodon, the massive ancient shark. To see Dr. Johnson’s Deep Time Climate keynote, WATCH THE CLIP